(AllHipHop Features) Ahmaud Arbery. The name is now known all over the world as-yet-another case of extreme, violent racism and injustice in America that harkens to the days when the Ku Klux Klan terrorized Black American citizens. Arbery, 25, was jogging in a small community inside of Brunswick, Georgia when he was essentially hunted down and murdered by two men that claimed they were trying to make a citizen’s arrest. Gregory McMichael, 64, and his son Travis McMichael (the shooter), 34, are now charged with aggravated assault and felony murder.

Arbery’s violent, senseless end actually occurred on February 23, but a video of the horrific act created an international conundrum that pressured the DA, who worked closely with former police officer Gregory McMichael. Finally charged, both McMichaels now sit in a cell, which may be the safest place for them.

The Abery case also birthed the NFAC (Not Fu##kin Around Coalition), a group of Black military men and former U.S. military that are fed up with unarmed African Americans being killed by police or the George Zimmermans and McMicheals of the world. As this plays out, there are numerous other police brutality cases – all during the pandemic. But the history of Black men and women and State-sanctioned violence is not new. It is like apple pie. Grand Master Jay, activist, ex-military man, 2016 US Presidential Candidate and the founder of the NFAC, granted Chuck “Jigsaw” Creekmur an exclusive in-depth, lengthy interview that outlines many of the inconsistencies with the case, the on-the-ground logistics and why guns are a necessary response to cases like Abery murder.

The conversation, which was impromptu, was recorded. To listen, the audio is below. Later, an edited version of this interview will be released.

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About Author: integral
A free-thinking individual who strives to maintain psychological balance between the two polar aspects of Human Nature; Desire and Conscience. However, These conditions can never be balanced because inertia will carry us to extremes. Balance is a constant struggle therefore I live by the principles of the HERU Interface